Open Access Original article

Resolving the spatial relationship between intracellular components by dual color super resolution optical fluctuations imaging (SOFI)

Maria Elena Gallina12, Jianmin Xu1, Thomas Dertinger13, Adva Aizer4, Yaron Shav-Tal4 and Shimon Weiss1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Physiology, and the California NanoSystem Institute (CNSI), University of California Los Angeles, 90095-1569, Los Angeles, CA, USA

2 Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy

3 SOFast GmbH, Dresdener Str 14, 10999, Berlin, Germany

4 The Mina & Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences & Institute of Nanotechnology, Bar-Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel

For all author emails, please log on.

Optical Nanoscopy 2013, 2:2  doi:10.1186/2192-2853-2-2

Published: 25 February 2013

Abstract

Background

Multi-color super-resolution (SR) imaging microscopy techniques can resolve ultrastructural relationships between- and provide co-localization information of- different proteins inside the cell or even within organelles at a higher resolution than afforded by conventional diffraction-limited imaging. While still very challenging, important SR colocalization results have been reported in recent years using STED, PALM and STORM techniques.

Results

In this work, we demonstrate dual-color Super Resolution Optical Fluctuations Imaging (SOFI) using a standard far-field fluorescence microscope and different color blinking quantum dots. We define the spatial relationship between hDcp1a, a processing body (P-body, PB) protein, and the tubulin cytoskeletal network. Our finding could open up new perspectives on the role of the cytoskeleton in PB formation and assembly. Further insights into PB internal organization are also reported and discussed.

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate the suitability and facile use of multi-color SOFI for the investigation of intracellular ultrastructures.

Keywords:
Dual color; Superresolution; Fluorescence microscopy; SOFI; P-bodies